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Neither major medical insurance nor Medicare covers long-term care. Traditionally, Medicare, Medicaid, and major medical insurance may pay for some but do not cover costs completely. They may only cover short nursing home stays or limited amounts of home health care when skilled nursing or rehabilitation is required. They also do not pay for custodial care which includes supervision and assistance with everyday tasks.

Acute and chronic long-term care represent two ends of the care spectrum. Acute care is medical care designed to treat or cure an acute condition such as a stroke or heart attack. Treatment is typically provided in a hospital by a doctor. On the other hand, LTC includes skilled, therapeutic and personal services of support that are needed by someone whose condition limits their ability to function independently. The goal is to keep them comfortable and to prevent the condition from worsening. Some people need long term care for several months, but others need it for years or their lifetime. There is quite a difference between acute and long-term care in terms of who receives the care, the care need, the goal of the care, by whom the care is provided and how the care is paid for.

ADL, or Activities of Daily Living, are the everyday actions that a person needs to be able to perform in order to live independently, including bathing, toileting, dressing, eating, continence and transferring. An individual who requires assistance with two or more ADL is a candidate for long-term care coverage. Many individuals planning for LTC weigh these decisions the most:

Protect Your Savings
More Choices for Care
Help Your Family
Freedom of Choice
Protect Your Savings

Long-term care costs can drain a retirement nest egg very rapidly. According to Genworth, the National Median cost for a nursing home private room in the United States in 2019 was $102,200. This rate continues to increase every year.

More Choices for Care

The more you can spend, the better quality of care you will be able to receive. If you rely on Medicaid, choices will be limited to nursing homes that only accept payment from the government program, and Medicaid does not even pay for assisted living in many states. Considering long-term care costs is a necessary part of any long-range financial plan.

Help Your Family

You don’t want to create an emotional or physical strain on family members who would assist in your care. Families who have long-term care insurance tend to seek outside professional help sooner and with less family conflict. Additionally, opportunities are enhanced to remain at home with professional in-home care.

Freedom of Choice

When you purchase long-term care insurance, you will have the necessary resources to afford quality care as well as the ability to choose how and where the care is received. Those who fail to purchase long-term care insurance or those without substantial resources of their own, simply will not have as many options for care.


Most people associate long-term care as an end of life need for the elderly. However, The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services states that 43% of the 12 million Americans receiving long-term care are between the ages of 18 and 64. The main reason for their care is spinal injuries from motor vehicle accidents. The need for long-term care could happen at any time; there is no such thing as being too prepared. You will not qualify for long-term care insurance if you already have a debilitating condition.

We are committed to helping people plan ahead so they will be prepared in the event that they are faced with a catastrophic, life-changing event that leaves them with a chronic condition where they are unable to perform two of the six ADL.